add ul for contact information
[don.git] / resume / teaching_statement.mdwn
1
2
3 # Why I teach
4
5 I have always wanted to know how everything works, interconnects, and
6 evolved. That moment when a flash of insight shines a light on the
7 underlying structure of nature is an incredible feeling. Like many
8 researchers in science, I willingly subject myself to experimental
9 failures, difficult-to-interpret results, funding difficulties, and
10 long hours in order to receive that momentary feeling.
11
12 I teach because I want to share the excitement of discovery and
13 knowing, and I want others to be able to experience that excitement
14 for themselves. It is also quite rewarding to see the glimmer of
15 insight in my students eyes when they finally reach understanding for
16 themselves.
17
18 # General Goals for Students
19
20 ## Desire and Excitement
21
22 If my students are *only* interested in learning the material I am
23 teaching to earn credit, then I have failed as a teacher. I want to
24 covey at least some of my excitement in the subject to them.
25 Perhaps it's na├»ve, but I think that once students are excited about
26 the material, they are more likely to succeed.
27
28 ## Informed Skepticism
29
30 While only a small percentage of my students will become scientists, I
31 want them all to know how science works, how to analyze claims, weigh
32 evidence, do background research, and come to an independent
33 understanding of nature. From politics to the latest false claim on
34 the Internet, an ability to become informed, think critically, and
35 analyze skeptically will help my students be conscientious members of
36 our democratic society.
37
38 # How I Teach
39
40 ## Task Analysis
41
42
43 For each course, I identify course-specific overall goals that I want
44 all of my students to achieve. Then, I plan a path to these goals,
45 with a hierarchy of sub-goals along the way. This enables me to
46 measure the effectiveness of my teaching and the students' progress at
47 each step during the course. For example, in an introductory
48 bioinformatics course, an overall goal might be to have students be
49 able to use common bioinformatic databases to answer biological
50 questions. A corresponding sub goal would be for students to be able
51 to use dbSNP to select all genetic variants in a specific gene in a
52 specific organism.
53
54 ## Learn By Doing
55
56 Even though lecturing, demonstrations, and similar passive learning
57 techniques are important, everyone learns best by doing. Mistakes,
58 failure, experimentation, and learning from them are important parts
59 of learning by doing, just as they are in science. To the greatest
60 extent possible, I want to provide opportunities for students to learn
61 by doing. I want students to learn by solving problems using the
62 knowledge and resources they have gained in the course.
63
64 ## Individual Engagement
65
66 In large courses it is very difficult to keep individual students
67 engaged, as they feel they are just one face in a hundred and have
68 limited opportunities to ask questions. When lecturing, I like to
69 combat this by asking students questions directly, and getting
70 students (even those at the back) to participate in demonstrations. I
71 will also be accessible both in-person on campus, and via e-mail.
72 Finally, I will encourage my teaching assistants (TAs) to be engaged
73 with our students by asking TAs about students in their sections in TA
74 meetings.
75
76 ## Students Teaching Others
77
78
79 Having every student engaged with a teacher is a laudable goal, and
80 may be achievable in small  in large ones, there will always
81 be some people who are not reached. Students teaching other students
82 is one method of extending a teacher's reach. In the past, I have had
83 online forums or mailing lists for all courses that I have taught. In
84 these forums, students are able to ask questions, and other students
85 are able to answer them. In addition, students are able to reinforce
86 their learning by answering other student's questions. You know a
87 concept when you can teach others.
88
89 ## Technology
90
91 Classroom technology is very useful in increasing the ability of
92 students to learn, experiment, and measuring outcomes in the
93 classroom. I plan on using:
94
95 1.  Interactive websites to enable student's active learning by doing,
96     including exercises, experiments, and other activities.
97
98 2.  Real-time online feedback using automated grading on a website to
99     the extent possible on homework so students know whether they
100     understand the material.
101
102 3.  In-lecture questions through clickers or smart phones when the
103     course is too large to gauge student understanding of material by
104     asking questions of students or raising hands.
105
106 4.  Recording lectures so that students (and I) can refer to them
107     later.
108
109 5.  Forums, mailing lists, and other communication methods so that
110     students can learn cooperatively. When students explain material to
111     other students, it answers other student's questions and reinforces
112     their own knowledge.
113
114 6.  Demonstrations in class and online, both real and simulated, when
115     appropriate to the material being taught.
116
117 # Measuring Outcomes
118
119 ## Success and Failure
120
121 I'm continuing to study how to be a more effective teacher by learning
122 from other teachers and research into teaching techniques, and will
123 continue to do that as long as I teach. I will measure the outcomes of
124 my teaching in order to determine how effective I am. By correlating
125 the teaching methods I use for each sub-goal of my course with student
126 outcomes, over time I can identify the most effective teaching
127 strategies for me.
128
129 # Teaching Experiences
130
131 ## Teaching Assistant
132
133 While a graduate student at UC Riverside, I was a teaching assistant
134 for Introductory Biology, Introductory
135 Genetics, Molecular Biology, and Developmental Biology.
136 <div id="footnotes">
137 <h2 class="footnotes">Footnotes: </h2>
138 <div id="text-footnotes">
139
140 <div class="footdef"><sup><a id="fn.1" name="fn.1" class="footnum" href="#fnr.1">1</a></sup> <p><http://www.biology.ucr.edu/courses/UGcourses.html></p></div>
141
142
143 </div>
144 </div>